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Tuesday
Aug202013

Empty Splendor

To have a genuine appreciation for the world we must see it directly, says the late Traleg Rinpoche. The tantric path teaches us how to cut through our concepts and confusion so we can experience reality in its full vividness and clarity.

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Tuesday
Aug202013

Forum: Karma: Fate or Freedom? 

Introduction By David Loy

Many Buddhist teachings seem quite modern in their emphasis on such things as impermanence and interde­pendence (evolution, ecology), insubstantial­ity (physics), and the deceptions of language (philosophy). Yet the same cannot be said for karma, which points to an inexorable moral law built into the cosmos. This doesn’t mean that the doctrine of karma should be dismissed or ignored, but it does encourage us to interrogate those teachings and to ask, what does karma mean for us today?

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Tuesday
Aug202013

The View from Mount Meru

In light of modern knowledge, traditional Buddhist cosmology may seem irrelevant or quaint at best. But as Ajahn Punnadhammo explains, the world system it describes contains important insights for practicing the Buddhist teachings.

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Tuesday
Aug202013

Preparing to Die 

Death is a journey into the unknown, but like any journey it goes better if you’re prepared. Andrew Holecek offers meditations and teachings from the Tibetan Buddhist tradition to help you prepare for the end of life—and what comes next.

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Tuesday
Aug202013

Rules to Live By

Doing the right thing doesn’t always mean following the rules, says Edward Brown. He only wishes he had known that years ago when he was deciding the fate of a young Zen student at Tassajara.

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Tuesday
Aug202013

Let's Talk: What are you doing to protect your Buddhist treasures?

Ann Shaftel says there are many things we can and must do to preserve sacred Buddhist art.

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Tuesday
Aug202013

Ask the Teachers

Zenkei Blanche Hartman, Geshe Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche, and Narayan Helen Liebenson

Q: How does a meditator deal with episodes of major depression?

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Tuesday
Aug202013

From Folk Hero to Deity

Reviewed by Geoffrey Samuel

The Epic Of Gesar Of Ling: Gesar’s Magical Birth, Early Years And Coronation As King Translated By Robin Kornman, Sangye Khandro, and Lama Chönam

Shambhala Publications, 2013 680 pages; $120

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Tuesday
Aug202013

Book Briefs

Although movies and hype about Zen martial arts abound, there are very few good books available on the disciplines. Sword of Zen (Hawaii 2013) transcends cliché musings about Zen swordplay and introduces us to the world of one of Japan’s most renowned Zen sword mas­ters, Takuan Soho (1573–1645). Along with an informative introduction and biographical sketch of Master Takuan, the book includes translations of two of his most important works on Zen swordsmanship. Author and translator Peter Haskell describes the texts in translation as “user manuals” for the Zen mind. Written to illuminate the principles of Zen through the warrior’s art, they guide the practitioner through combat situ­ations as well as daily life. For instance, Master Takuan demonstrates how a swordsman must move swiftly through a succession of attacks in battle without getting stuck on any one attacker or interrupting the flow of nonthought, and how this exemplifies the spontaneity and responsive­ness that is embodied by the Zen mind.

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Tuesday
Aug202013

Profile: Mangala Shri Bhuti

Growing up in rural northern India amid the Tibetan diaspora, Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche was always fascinated by America, but he never dreamed he would one day wind up living there, leading a vibrant sangha of dedicated practitioners. Yet by his early twenties he had met and married an American, Elizabeth Mattis-Namgyel, and the two were living in Nepal, where she was teaching English. In 1989 their lives took an unexpected turn when Mattis-Namgyel, at home with their newborn son, realized she would have to resume teaching at the American Cultural Center to keep the working visa that allowed her to stay in Nepal.

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